ADHD Tips

ADHD Myths and Misconceptions
ADHD Myths and Misconceptions

A diagnosis of ADHD can be a daunting. There are a lot of misconceptions and preconceived notions about what having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Let’s clear up some of the ones that seem to be the most prevalent. Myth: It’s not a real disorder Let’s start with one of the major ADHD myths - ADHD isn’t real; it’s not a legitimate diagnosis. In reality, ADHD is a neurobiological disorder that has been clinically observed for more than 100 years and is recognized today all major medical associations and government health agencies due to overwhelming scientific evidence. Myth: ADHD is a “Boys Only” Disorder In actuality, girls are just as likely to have ADHD as boys but because this myth is out there and boys may show more of the visible “hyperactive” symptoms rather than the less obvious “inattentive” symptoms, boys are more likely to be diagnosed. The breakdown of “who” has ADHD according to CADDAC is as follows: ADHD is the most common mental health disorder in children. 80% of those diagnosed with ADHD in childhood maintain the diagnosis into adolescence and 60% are still affected by core symptoms into adulthood. No matter what it might seem like in the media, ADHD is underdiagnosed and...

ADHD Students: Tips to help create a more focused classroom
ADHD Students: Tips to help create a more focused classroom

ADHD Students and Teachers - This one is for you! It's back to school and the Huffington Post pulled together a great list of ADHD tips that may help teachers who have ADHD students in their classrooms. Here are a few of the tips they mention but you can see the complete list by clicking here. ADHD students need structure - Make lists, tables, reminders and previews to help them keep up. Make sure ADHD students sit at the front of the class or even better arrange the seats in a circle. This lets ADHD students stay focused because someone is always looking at them. Make eye contact, as often as possible. Use names. Nothing gets your attention quicker than your teacher calling your name. Make sure they get out and enjoy recess. Physical activity is vital for mental focus. Stay alert to situations that might cause over stimulation. Make large tasks smaller by breaking them down into smaller more manageable sections. Reward good behaviour with positive feedback. A pat on the back goes a long way to keeping ADHD students engaged. Incentivize – remember how you loved getting that gold star or being able to erase the chalkboard. ADHD students...