ADHD Management

Tour de Force versus Tour de France: When Cheerleading Goes Wrong

The definition of tour de force in the Oxford dictionary is “an impressive performance or achievement that has been accomplished or managed with great skill.” Imagine your child or teen has written an essay with impressive skill and well-managed time, hitting the deadline with a fabulous finished product. Your child’s teacher might call the essay a tour de force, a great accomplishment worth celebrating! Let’s switch gears (bike pun intended). The Tour de France is a famous cycling race that occurs in France and a few neighboring countries every year. The course is gruelling, happening in 21 stages, each a day long, and lasting 23 days. Last week in the competition, disaster struck. A fan, holding a sign on the sidelines, became overly zealous. As the cyclists rounded a corner, the fan leaned over the road—ever so slightly. That decision, even if well-intentioned, was catastrophic. A cyclist hit the sign, lost balance, and fell. What happened next, in an instant, was a massive domino effect. Cyclist after cyclist skidded, fell, and crashed. News outlets everywhere are sharing the photographs: mangled metal, multiple injuries, and heaping heartache among athletes who had trained relentlessly for the...

Coaching for ADHD and ADD: Different Stories, Common Goals, Tailored Approaches

Research shows that ADHD Coaching has a positive impact on the lives of children and teens (Ahman et al., 2017), college students (Prevatt & Yelland, 2015), and adults (Kubik, 2010). Gains in time management, motivation, self-esteem, and learning and study strategies have been documented, along with diminished feelings of distress. At Possibilities, we offer ADHD Coaching from regulated healthcare professionals to people of all ages. Our clients are courageous and inspiring as they move towards change. Here are some of their stories. Max is 10 years old. He is shy and curious, and his face boasts a flash of freckles and a spontaneous grin. ADHD is not a new diagnosis for him; it’s been on his IEP forever, along with a significant Learning Disability in reading. Book reports are tough, graphic novels are easier, and drawing is a skill he practices daily. Emily is 16. Her vintage-inspired glasses make her look smart, and she is. Early on she was identified at school as being gifted. Emily works harder than her classmates to achieve solid grades, and has big dreams of becoming an architect or doctor. Emily’s ADD was caught somewhat late in the game—just last year.  Gritty persistence that yielded decent grades...

Going Green: ADHD and a Walk in the Park

With the advent of Earth Day 2021 it seems a great time to explore the effects of green spaces on ADHD. Here’s a scientific study you need to know about. In 2009, Andrea Faber Taylor and Frances Kuo from the University of Illinois published a paper in the Journal of Attention Disorders called Children with Attention Deficit Disorders Concentrate Better After Walk in the Park.  Before we get to the findings, here’s some background. Faber Taylor and Kuo talk about theories of ADHD. One—called Attention Restoration Theory (ART)—suggests that there are two types of attention exercised by all brains. One type is deliberate, effortful focus, the kind you use when you are deliberately learning something that can’t be grasped easily. The second type is involuntary, effortless attention, the kind we exercise when we aren’t learning something specific or hard, but just absorbing the world around us or making fast connections when learning is super easy or entertaining for our brains.  Scientists thinking about Attention Deficit Disorders have hypothesized that the second kind of attention is intact in ADHD—the kind where you can absorb what is pleasing around you without too much strain. So, individuals with ADHD can focus on activities they enjoy for hours without much fatigue....