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How Occupational Therapy can help your child with ADHD/ADD

Occupational Therapists (OTs) are trained in task analysis so they can work with children, families and their family health and school teams to identify their strengths and challenges in an activity, the factors in the activity and the environment that affect their participation in the activity. OTs not only help the child learn the skill, they may also modify the activity or adapt the environment so the child can participate fully and perform the task. Simple changes, like an adapted pencil grip, carrying around a fidget toy or adjusting the classroom and/or desk & chair set-up, can help a child be more successful. Here are some strategies you can try at home to help your child: Use a visual timer during tasks where your child has difficulties focusing: Analog clocks show the passage of time more visually than digital clocks, which allows us to anticipate events. To provide further visual cueing and reduce anxiety of not knowing when time is up/being told to end an activity “all of a sudden”, try a sand timer or a Time Timer so your child can see how much time is left! Try a visual schedule for daily routines: A visual representation of the various...

A FREE LECTURE FOR ADULTS WITH ADHD
A FREE Lecture for Adults with ADHD

Improv for Adults with ADHD: How Improv Can Help You Find Answers Within Yourself This talk will discuss how Improv techniques can help you improve communication skills, learn to self-regulate and boost social skills. The evening will also include a free Improv session that will introduce you to our upcoming Improv workshop, I-Zone For Adults with ADHD. Speaker: Deborah Levine, Ph.D. RSW Featuring: David Boyce, Actor, Improv Instructor When: Monday, January 30, 2017, 6:30 pm to 8:00 pm Where: The Possibilities Clinic, 55 Eglinton Ave. East, Suite 305 Registration is FREE, but you must call to reserve your seat. Space is Limited. Register by phone: 416.482.5558 or email...

HOME DESIGN FOR ADHD & BEST PRACTICES
Home Design for ADHD & Best Practices

Well, the 2017 IKEA catalog has arrived and already I feel a love-hate relationship brewing. Sure, a love-hate anything is probably not healthy, but let me clear my cluttered desk with a quick swoop of the arm (oops—grab coffee cup before it topples) and settle into my quiet chaos as I explain. The IKEA brand boasts clean lines and organized living, not to mention fabulous meatballs and short pencils you can pop in your pocket if you choose to walk away with something other than furniture on a visit to any IKEA store. Seeing everything in its proper place—on shelving and on hooks, in bins and in baskets—is truly inspiring, and definitely worth loving on page after glossy page. But picture-perfect configuration can be deflating, too, (hence the hate part) if you scan your home and are smacked with strewn knapsacks, a scattering of shoes, and a tornado of toys. It’s easy to grant yourself a pass, and that’s more than fair. Comedian Phyllis Diller once said, “Cleaning your house while your kids are still growing is like shoveling the sidewalk before it stops snowing.” How true! And with limited hours in any day, it goes without saying that meal prep, bath...

Four Ways to Create a Love of Story in Struggling Readers

A few years ago I found myself at a screenwriter’s course over two days in Toronto. Okay, I guess it was more of a mini-introduction for hopeful enthusiasts than a full course for the paid movie writing professionally if you insist on being technical. But for two very intense days I listened to Hollywood script doctors describe the elements of a good story—the kind of story that keeps you on the edge of your seat even when you already know that the good guys will win, the unlikely couple will fall in love, and the world will pull through despite imminent threats and cataclysmic countdowns. Good stories are big business—whether in books, on television or in films. Good stories keep us watching. Good stories keep us reading. Good stories keep us listening. As a child psychologist, I often meet parents whose children are struggling to read. Usually, those children are challenged at the single word level, meaning they find it hard to sound out letters and to blend those letters to sound out words. It’s tough to appreciate any story—and to keep track of even basic ideas—when sounding out letters and words is frustrating and exhausting. So what is a parent to...

ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Comorbidity and Treatment

Dr. Almagor, Possibilities Director and President Elect of CADDRA will be presenting at this year's CADDRA ADHD conference in Vancouver which runs October 16-18. Seminar Abstract. In recent years the link between ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been recognized as an increasingly important issue for consideration in clinical practice and research. Clinicians have long recognized that individuals with ADHD frequently exhibit the same type of social deficits associated with ASD. Conversely, individuals with ASD often display attention and hyperactivity issues common to ADHD. Neurobiological and genetic underpinnings linking these two disorders have been identified. The importance of recognizing commonalities will be examined. Methodology and issues associated with making comorbid diagnoses will be discussed. Treatment approaches will also be explored, including pharmacological trials and psychosocial strategies that acknowledge commonalities across these conditions. Learning Objectives. After this presentation, participants will be better able to: Appreciate the differential diagnosis of ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Assess issues and dilemmas in the diagnosis of comorbid ADHD and ASD. Discuss validated medical and psychosocial strategies in the treatment of comorbid ADHD and ASD. Audience: Psychiatrists, family physicians, pediatricians, psychologists, nurse practitioners, allied health professionals Knowledge Level: Intermediate, Advanced For a complete list of all seminars and guest speakers...